Starting New Plants From Parts

Seeds and transplants are not the only forms from which to raise new plants; they're the forms you'll use most often, but some vegetables are started from other plant parts — suckers, tubers, slips, crowns, sets, cloves, divisions, or cuttings. In some cases plants can be grown either from seed or from plant parts. Onions, for instance, take a very long time to germinate from seed, so it usually makes more sense to grow them from sets. Other plants grow best from plant parts. The following are ways to start vegetables from plant parts:

  1. Suckers, or offshoots, are plants that grow or shoot up from the root system of a mature plant. These suckers are dug up and divided from the mother plant, then transplanted to mature into new plants. Globe artichokes are usually the only vegetables grown from suckers.
  2. Divisions, like suckers, occur naturally in the form of small rooted plants or bulbs that grow from the mother plant, and get their name from the way you separate — or divide — them off to grow as individual plants. You can dig up the new growth as it appears and replant It. Or, as with bulbs, you can dig up the mother plant, separate the small new bulbs, and replant each unit. Horseradish and rhubarb are grown from divisions. You can divide plants in spring or in fall; fall is preferable, because the cool, moist weather gives the new plants better conditions in which to become established.
  3. Cuttings are divisions that don't occur naturally. You obtain them by cutting a piece of stem or side-branch from the plant at a node — a lumpy area on the stem. The cutting is then placed in the soil and forms its own roots. You can also put the cutting in water until roots form.
  4. Slips are young, tender, rooted cuttings or sprouts grown from roots. Sweet potatoes are the only vegetables commonly grown from slips.
  5. These are specialized swollen underground stems, capable of producing roots, stems, and leaves. Irish potatoes and Jerusalem artichokes are usually grown from tubers. When the tubers are cut up for planting, as in the case of Irish potatoes, they are called seed pieces.
  6. These are compressed stems near the soil surface that are capable of producing leaves and roots. Crowns are often planted with the roots attached, in which case they're more accurately referred to as roots. Crowns can be divided when the plants are dormant. Asparagus is usually grown from crowns.
  7. Sets are one-year-old onion seedlings that were pulled when the bulbs were young. The bulbs are then air dried, stored for the winter, and planted the next spring. Onions are the only vegetables grown from sets.
  8. These are the segmented parts of a bulb; they're also called bulblets. Garlic is the only vegetable commonly grown from cloves. Each garlic bulb is made up of a dozen or more cloves, and you plant each clove separately. Don't divide the bulb until you're ready to plant; separating the cloves too early may result in lower yields.
WHEN TO PLANT YOUR VEGETABLES IN SPRING

Very hardy vegetables:

Hardy vegetables:

Tender vegetables:

Very tender vegetables:

Plant 4 to 6 weeks before the

Plant2 to 3 weeks before the

Plant on the average date of

Plant 2 to 3 weeks after the

average date of last frost.

average date of last frost.

last frost.

average date of last frost.

Asparagus

Beet

Artichoke, globe

Bean, lima

Broccoli

Cardoon

Bean, broad

Chayote

Brussels sprouts

Carrot

Bean, dry

Chick pea

Cabbage

Celeriac

Bean, mung

Cucumber

Cauliflower

Celery

Bean, snap

Eggplant

Chinese cabbage

Chard

Corn

Muskmelon

Collards

Chicory

Cress

Okra

Horseradish

Dandelion

Mustard

Pea, black-eyed

Kale

Endive

Sorrel

Peanut

Kohlrabi

Jerusalem artichoke

Soybean

Pepper, hot

Leek

Lentil

Tomato

Pepper, sweet

Lettuce

Parsnip

Herbs:

Pumpkin

Onion

Potato, Irish

Basil

Squash, summer

Pea

Radish •

Caraway

Squash, winter

Rhubarb

Salsify

Chervil

Sweet potato

Rhutabaga

Spinach, New Zealand

Coriander

Watermelon

Shallot

Turnip

Dill

Sorrel

Herbs:

Sage

Spinach

Anise

Sesame

Herbs:

Borage

Chives

Fennel

Garlic

Marjoram

Spearmint

Oregano

Peppermint

Parsley

Tarragon

Rosemary

Thyme

Savory

Vegetable

Inches between plants

Indies between rows

Depth of seed (inches)

Artichoke, globe

36-48

48-60

Asparagus

12-18

36-48

1-1 %

Beans, broad

8-10

36-48

1-2

Beans, dry

4-6

18-24

1-1%

Beans, lima bush pole

2-3 4-6

1-1'/a

Beans, mung

18-20

18-24

V2

Beans, snap or green bush pole

2-3 4-6

1-1%

Beets

2-3

12-18

1

Broccoli

3

24-36

V2

Brussels sprouts

24

24-36

%

Cabbage

18-24

24-36

%

Cardoon

18-24

36-48

1/2

Carrot

2-4

12-24

'A

Cauliflower

18-24

24-36

Celeriac

6-8

24-30

'A

Celery

8-10

24-30

%

Chard

9-12

18-24

1

Chayote

24-30

60

Chick pea

6-8

12-18

%

Chickory

12-18

24-36

1

Chinese cabbage

8-12

18-30

1/2

Collards

12

18-24

%

Corn

2-4

12-18

1-1%

Cress

1-2

18-24

'A

Cucumber In inverted hills 36 inches apart*

12

18-72

%

Dandelion

6-8

12-18

%

Eggplant

18-24

24-36

%

Endive

9-12

18-24

y8

Fennel

12-14

24-36

%

Horseradish

24

18-24

%

Jerusalem artichoke

12-18

24-36

Kale

8-12

18-24

1/2

Kohlrabi

5-6

18-24

V.

Leek

6-9

12-18

%

Lentils

1-2

18-24

%

Vegetable

Inches between plants

Inches between rows

Depth of seed (inches)

Lettuce

6-12

12-18

y8

Muskmelon In inverted hills 36 inches apart*

18-24

60-96

1

Mustard

6-12

12-24

'/2

Okra

12-18

24-36

Vi-1

Onion sets seeds

2-3 1-2

12-18 12-18

V*

Parsnip

2-4

18-24

Vi

Pea, black-eyed

8-12

12-18

Vi

Pea, shelling

1-2

18-24

2

Peanut

6-B

12-18

1

Pepper

18-24

24-36

1/2

Potato, Irish

12-18

24-36

4

Pumpkin In inverted hills 72 inches apart*

24-48

60-120

1

Radish

1-6

12-18

%

Rhubarb

30-36

36-48

Rutabaga

6-8

18-24

'A

Salsify

2-4

18-24

'/2

Shallot

6-8

12-18

y<

Sorrel

12-18

18-24

'A

Soybean

VA-2

24-30

y2-i

Spinach

2-4

12-24

Spinach, New Zealand

12

24-36

Vz

Squash, summer In inverted hills 48 inches apart*

24-36

18-48

1

Squash, winter In inverted hills 72 inches apart*

24-48

60-120

1

Sweet potato

36-48

3-5

Tomato

18-36

24-48

Vi

Turnip greens roots

3-4

12-24 12-24

Vt Vt

Watermelon In inverted hills 72 inches apart

24-72

60-120

1

Indies

Inches

between

between

Depth of seed

Herb

plants

rows

(inches)

Anise

6-12

18-24

Va

Basil

4-6

18-24

Va

Borage

12

18-24

Vl

Caraway

12-18

18-24

Va

Chervil

3-4

18-24

T6

Chives

8-10

12

V*

Coriander

12

12-18

Va

Dill

12

24-36

Va

Fennel

12

2-3

Va

Garlic

3-6

24-36

2-3 (sets)

Marjoram

6-12

18-24

Va

Mint

2-3

18-24

Va

Oregano

6-12

12-18

Va

Parsley

12-18

18-24

Va

Rosemary

18

1&-24

%

Sage

12

18-24

%

Savory

6-18

12-18

Va

Sesame

6

12-18

Va

Tarragon

18-24

24-36

Va

Thyme

12

16-24

Va

Caninq ffon Ifoun Qanden

Dill Plant

Planting your garden gives you a great sense of achievement, but this feeling is a bit deceptive—your labors are by no means over. In fact, you're actually only just starting. When you decide to grow a garden, you have to be willing to take on the daily chores that go with caring for it—watering, weeding, mulching, and protecting your crop against pests and disease. You could just sit back and let nature do the work. But if you don't do your part, the result will be lower yields or lower-quality produce.

WEEDING: KEEPING OUT INTRUDERS

Cultivating, or weeding, is probably going to be your most demanding task as your garden's caretaker. Weeds are pushy plants, and they're both resilient and persistent. You'll probably feel at times that if your vegetables grew as well and as fast as your weeds do, gardening would be child's play. It's important to keep down the weeds in your vegetable garden; they steal light, water, and food from the vegetables, and they shelter insects and diseases. The cabbage aphid, for example, will make do with mustard weed while it's waiting to feast on your cabbage or kale. And a green lawn in its proper place soothes the soul and feeds the vanity of the gardener; but in the wrong place the grass roots can choke out young vegetable plants.

Vegetables Plants Pictures
I

Bindweed

Recognizing garden weeds

To control the weeds in your garden successfully, you have to be able to recognize them when they are young. When weeds are small, regular cultivation will control them easily. If you let them become established, you're going to have a hard time getting rid of them. The next few pages will guide you through the world of weeds and help you to tell, so to speak, your wheat from your chaff. If the children are going to be helping you in the garden, be sure that they, too, know the difference between the vegetables and the weeds. Children—especially small ones—often have trouble figuring out why one plant is desirable and another isn't (some weeds are very attractive), and their well-intentioned help could be destructive.

Here is a guide to help you recognize some of the weeds you're most likely to find in your vegetable garden:

Bindweed (Convolvulus species). The bindweed is a climbing plant with small delicate morning-glorylike flowers. Given its own way, the bindweed will climb up plants and soon choke everything in reach, and it's very difficult to get rid of because every piece of broken root seems capable of propagating a new plant.

Burdock (Arctium species). This plant looks like a coarse rhubarb. Many people have given it garden

Sweet Pepper Plants
Burdock

room only to find, late in the summer, that their only harvest will be burrs.

Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). This is a perennial that spreads on horizontal roots. The leaves are usually crinkled, edged vAith spines or thorns. The flowers are spiny balls topped with purple tufts. Wear a good pair of gloves, and pull out the whole plant; try to remove as much of the root as possible.

Chickweed (Stellaria media). The chickweed is a lacy plant that spreads out over the ground like a doily. It has tiny daisylike flowers, but despite its delicate appearance it should be destroyed when quite young, because it will spread all over the place if you let it go to seed.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). The dandelion is best known to nongardeners for its bright yellow flowers and its seedhead of light, feathery seeds. Gardeners know it for its long, persistent taproot. Recognize the dandelion by its rosette of jagged leaves, and remove it as soon as possible—preferably when the soil is moist. If you try to pull out the root when the soil is dry and hard you'll probably break it, leaving part of the root in the ground to grow right back into another healthy dandelion plant. The dandelion can be grown as a legitimate vegetable, but the weed in your garden won't double for its cultivated cousin.

Ground ivy or creeping charlie (Colechoma hederacea). This is a vining plant with small funnel-

shaped flowers that have a purplish color. It's very adventurous and crawls along the ground on stems that may extend to a length of five feet. The leaves are almost round and grow in clumps at each node along the square stem. Ground ivy may be one of the most persistent weeds you'll have to deal with in your garden, it will choose the shadiest side of your garden first, but once it becomes established it will spread anywhere. Pull up the entire plant; each node can regenerate a whole new plant.

Lamb's-quarters or goosefoot (Chenopodium album). You can recognize lamb's-quarters by its color—greyish-green with occasional red speckles. It's an upright plant that can grow four feet tall.

Mustard (Brassica nigra). The black mustard grown for its seeds is a good example of a useful plant that escaped from a proper garden and went wild. In some parts of California mustard plants 12 feet tall have taken over whole fields and become real pests.

Pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Pigweed is known as redroot, wild beet, or rough green amaranth. It is a rough plant that can grow to more than six feet in good soil.

Plantain (Plantago major and Plantago lanceolata). There are two plantains, Ruggle's plantain and buckhorn (also called English plantain or white man's footsteps). Both plants grow in rosettes and are rather similar to the plantain lily (Hosta). They have

Groundnut Aphid RosetteParts Vegetable Plant

thick clumps of roots that make them hard to pull out, anything that will support it. The large, shiny leaves except when the soil is very moist and soft. (two to four inches long) are grouped in threes and

Poison ivy (Rhus radicans). The poison ivy plant pointed at the tip. Every part of this plant contains a may be either a small shrub or a vine that can crawl up poisonous material that can cause blisters on your

Giant Pigweed SeedsAmbrosia Plant

skin. To avoid contact with the skin, control this weed by using a herbicide.

Purslane (Portulaca oleracea). Purslane, which is also called pusley or pigweed, grows flat on the ground. It has thick leaves and thick juicy stems, and it adores rich, freshly worked soil.

Ragweed. There are two types of ragweed: common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) and giant*

Portulaca TowerRaddish Parts

ragweed (Ambrosia trifida). Common ragweed is an annual that seeds itself and comes back every year. The leaves are smooth and deeply lobed. It's a much smaller plant than the giant ragweed and will grow only one to four feet tall. Pull up the entire plant before the seeds mature and assure you a return visit next year. Giant ragweed is a perennial, and as its name implies, it gets very large—it will tower to 12

Common Wood Sorrel Seed

to 18 feet in good soil. The leaves are large and slightly hairy, with three or occasionally five lobes. Male flowers are long spikes at the tips of the branches. As with its smaller cousin, pull up the entire plant when it is young before the seeds mature.

Smartweed (Polygonum species). Smartweed is a tough-rooted plant, with smooth stems, swollen joints, and long narrow leaves. Pull up the smartweeds and toss them on the compost pile.

Sour grass (Oxalis stricta). Sour grass is yellow wood sorrel, a delicate plantwith shamrocklike three-part leaves and delicate yellow flowers. Its seed capsules are capable of shooting seeds yards away when they ripen. It also has an underground root system that can reproduce without any seeds at all.

Violet (Viola species). It's hard to look on the innocent violet as a weed, but that's what it is. This small flowering plant has deep green heart-shaped leaves and a small, succulent root system that can be easily removed.

Keeping the weeds out of your garden

Once you've identified the weeds in your vegetable garden, the best way to control them is to chop them off at soil level with a sharp hoe or knife. If a weed is close to your vegetables, don't try to dig out the whole root system of the weed; in the process you may also damage the root systems of neighboring vegetables. Persistent weeds like dandelions may have to be cut down several times, but eventually the weed will die.

Herbicides, or chemical weed-killers, can be used in some instances. Mulches, which are organic or inorganic materials laid over the soil around your plants, can also control weeds to some extent. There are advantages and disadvantages to both methods.

Herbicides need careful handling

Herbicides can be useful in helping to control weeds under certain conditions, but these conditions are not usually encountered in the small home garden. And herbicides require such careful handling that the home gardener may be well advised not to use them more than absolutely necessary.

Herbicides can be either nonselective or selective. The nonselective types kill any plant with which they come in contact. Selective herbicides may kill only broad-leaved plants or only grass plants. Both types come in forms to kill preemergent germinating seeds without harming plants that are already growing above the ground, or vice versa. Those that act below the soil surface to kill preemergent seeds usually come in granule

Photos Parts Vegetable Plants

form. The granules are shaken on to the ground from the container. Contact herbicides that kill growing plants are usually bought in liquid form and diluted for use in a hand-sprayer or a sprayer that attaches to your hose. Whichever type you use, it's important to follow the manufacturer's instructions to the letter. It's also important to remember that herbicides may have residual effects that vary from product to product. The effect of some may last for weeks; the effect of others may last for years."

You can, if you wish, use a nonselective herbicide in the spring to clear an area for planting. If you do, carefully check that the residual effects will be gone well before your planting date—the information on the label will tell you this. If you misjudge the timing, and the effects of the herbicide persist beyond your planting date, you'll lose your whole crop for the season.

Here are some facts about herbicides you should be aware of:

  • Herbicides do not kill all weeds.
  • Herbicides can kill vegetables.
  • Herbicides that are safe to use in a certain area can drift quite a distance and damage sensitive plants, such as tomatoes and peppers.
  • No plant is entirely resistant to herbicides, so if you're using one it's important to follow the instructions exactly as they appear on the label.

If you decide to use a herbicide in your garden, follow these rules:

  • If you have a problem that cannot be solved by cultivating and you want to use a herbicide, contact your local Cooperative Extension Service for a reliable recommendation.
  • Read all of the label, every bit of fine print, and follow the instructions to the letter.
  • Do not use a herbicide unless it is labeled for a specific crop (read the whole label).
  • Be sure that the herbicide will not leave a toxic residue on the parts of the plant that you want to eat. •
  • Clean spray equipment carefully after each use.
  • Mark your herbicide equipment and keep it separate from that used for fertilizers, insecticides, or fungicides. Use herbicide equipment only for herbicides.

MULCHES HAVE MANY USES IN YOUR GARDEN

Mulches are either organic or inorganic material placed on the soil around the vegetable plants.

Mulches can perform a number of useful functions. They protect against soil erosion by breaking the force of heavy rains; they help prevent soil compaction; they discourage the growth of weeds; they reduce certain disease problems. Organic mulches improve the soil texture. Mulches are also insulators, making it possible to keep the soil warmer during cool weather and cooler during warm weather.

Mulches do not eliminate weeds. They can, however, help control them if the area has been cleared of weeds to begin with. If the mulch is thick enough, the weeds that are already growing won't be able to push through, and the darkness will frustrate the germination of others. Persistent weeds can push their way through most mulch, but if they're cut off at the soil level a few times they'll die. Sometimes mulches can improve the appearance of the vegetable garden by giving it a neater, more finished look. Some mulches give the area a professional look that only a true vegetable gardener can appreciate.

Whether you use an organic or an inorganic mulch, take care not to put it down before the soil has warmed up in the spring—the mulch will prevent the soil from warming and slow down root development. In the average garden in a cool-season climate mulch should be applied about five weeks after the average date of last frost.

Organic mulches improve soil quality

Organic mulches are organic materials that, when laid on the soil, decompose to feed the microorganisms and improve the quality of the soil. If you see that the mulch you've put down is decomposing quickly, add nitrogen to make up for nitrogen used by the bacteria. Some mulches can carry weed seeds; others can harbor undesirable organisms or pests, but both diseases and pests can usually be controlled by keeping the mulch stirred up. When you're cultivating, lift the mulch a little to keep the air circulating.

To use an organic mulch, spread a layer of the material you're using on the surface of the ground around the plants after the soil has warmed up in spring; the plants should be about four inches tall so the mulch doesn't overwhelm them. If you're using a fluffy material with large particles, like bark chips, make the layer about four inches thick. If you're using a denser material like straw or lawn clippings, a two-inch layer will be enough. Be careful not to suffocate the vegetables while you're trying to frustrate the weeds.

The following are organic materials commonly used as mulches:

Buckwheat hulls. These hulls last a long time and have a neutral color, but they're lightweight and can blow away; and sometimes they smell when the weather is hot and wet.

Chunk bark. Redwood and fir barks are available in several sizes. Bark makes good-looking paths and gives the area a neat, finished appearance, but it's too chunky to be the ideal mulch for vegetables. It also tends to float away when watered or rained on.

Compost. Partly decomposed compost makes a great mulch and soil conditioner. It looks a little rough, but other gardeners will know you're giving your garden the very best.

Crushed corncobs. Crushed cobs make an excellent and usually inexpensive mulch. The cobs need additional nitrogen, unless they are partially decomposed. Sometimes corn kernels are mixed in with the crushed corncobs; this will create extra weeding later on.

Lawn clippings. Do not use clippings from a lawn that has been treated with a herbicide or weed killer—these substances can kill the vegetables you're trying to grow. Let untreated clippings dry before putting them around your garden; fresh grass mats down and smells bad while it's decomposing.

  1. Leaves are cheap and usually easy to find, but they blow around and are hard to keep in place. They will stay where you want them better if they're ground up or partially decomposed. Nitrogen should be added to a leaf mulch. Do not use walnut leaves; they contain iodine, which is a growth retardant.
  2. Vintage, partially decomposed manure makes an excellent mulch. Manure has a strong bouquet that you may not appreciate, but don't use a manure that has been treated with odor-reducing chemicals; treated manures contain substances, such as boron, which are unhealthy for plants. Never use fresh, unrotted manure, it can kill your plants.

Mushroom compost (leftover, used). Where it's available, used mushroom compost is generally inexpensive. Its rich color blends in well with the colors of your garden.

Peat moss. Peat moss is expensive when large areas have to be covered. It must be kept moist or it will act like a blotter and pull moisture out of the soil and away from the plants. Once it dries, peat tends to shed water rather than letting it soak in, and the fine grades of peat have a tendency to blow away.

Poultry manure. This is potent stuff—poultry manure is about twice as strong as cow manure; proceed with caution. A good, weathered, four-year-old poultry litter can give you mulch, compost, and high-nitrogen fertilizer, all at the same time.

Sawdust. Sawdust is often available for the asking.

but it needs added nitrogen to prevent microorganisms from depleting the soil's nitrogen.

Straw. Straw is very messy and hard to apply in a small area, and it's highly flammable—matches or cigarettes can result in short-order cooking. It does, however, look very professional.

Wood chips or shavings. More chips and shavings are available now that they are no longer being burned as a waste product. They decompose slowly and add needed nitrogen. Beware of maple chips, which may carry verticillium wilt into your garden.

Recycle rugs, papers as inorganic mulch

Unlikely though it may seem to the inexperienced gardener, the following materials can be used effectively as inorganic mulches.

Aluminum foil. Foil is expensive if you're dealing with more than a small area, but it does make an effective mulch. It reflects sunlight, keeps the plants clean, and scares birds away from your garden.

Backless indoor-outdoor carpet. Indoor-outdoor carpeting is ideal for the small garden and makes it easy for the fastidious gardener to keep the place neat. Water goes through it easily, and the weeds are kept down.

Newspapers. Spread a thick layer of newspapers around the plants. Keep them in place with rocks or soil. They will decompose slowly and can be turned under as a soil modifier.

Rag rugs. An old rag rug holds water and keeps the soil moist. It won't look as neat as backless carpeting, but it will be just as effective.

Plastic mulches: pros and cons

Both clear and black polyethylene are used by commercial growers as inorganic mulches. Clear plastic is not recommended for small gardens because it encourages weeds; weeds just love the cozy greenhouse effect it creates. Black plastic is sometimes used in small gardens for plants that are grown in a group or hill, such as cucumbers, squash,orpumpkins. Black plastic should not be used for crops that need a cool growing season— cabbage or cauliflower, for instance—unless it's covered with a thick layer of light-reflecting material, such as sawdust.

There are some advantages to growing with a black plastic mulch. Black plastic reduces the loss of soil moisture, raises the soil temperature, and speeds up crop maturity. Weeds are discouraged, because the black plastic cuts out their light supply, so you won't have to cultivate as much; that means less danger of root damage. The plastic also helps keep plants cleaner. And when you're making a new garden in an area where there was a lot of grass—if you've dug up a lawn, for instance—black plastic can keep the grass from coming back .

There are some disadvantages to keep in mind as well, and one of them is that you may need to water more frequently. Because of their greater growth under plastic, the plants lose more water through transpiration, especially in well-drained, sandy soils. However, you will need to water less if you use black plastic on soil that holds water or drains poorly. If you're using a black plastic mulch, keep in mind that plants can wilt and rot if the soil moisture is kept at too high a level and there isn't enough air in the soil.

You can buy black plastic from many garden centers or order it by mail from seed and garden equipment catalogs. It should be at least 11/2 mil thick and about three to four feet wide. If you have a piece of wider or thicker black plastic, use it. The wider plastic is harder to handle, and the thicker type is more expensive, but it works well.

Put down black plastic mulch before the plants are set out. Try to pick a calm day; a strong wind will whip the plastic about and make laying it down hard work. Take a hoe and make a three-inch deep trench the length of the row. Lay one edge of the plastic in the trench and cover the edge with soil. Smooth the plastic over the bed and repeat the process on the other side. Be sure the plastic is anchored securely, or the wind will get under it and pull it up.

When you're ready to plant, cut holes about three inches across for the plants or seeds. After planting, anchor the edges of the holes with stones or soil. Water the plants through the holes in the mulch. After a rain, check to see if there are any spots where water is standing. If there are, punch holes through the plastic so the water can run through. After the plants are harvested, the plastic can be swept off, rolled up, and stored for use the next year.

Growing Vegetables In Containers For Beginners

Growing Vegetables In Containers For Beginners

Start Saving Money By Discovering How To Grow Your Own Fruit and Vegetables At Home From Start To Finish. Container gardening does not have to be expensive. With a bit of imagination you can reuse containers and items that are around your home and start your own container garden on a minimal budget. Of course, if you prefer you can buy containers from the store and make your container garden a feature in your home.

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