Sprayers

Sprayers are essential for the application of pesticides and fungicides in the garden, for spraying liquid fertilizer, for administering weed killer, for applying dormant sprays to fruit trees, and for many other purposes. Today, there are many improved designs on the market, offering different applicators and differing modes of operation.

Small hand sprayers or atomizers come in various types. There are some for small jobs that are like a Windex bottle—you simply pump the top with your fingers. These are especially useful if you want to spot-spray, keeping your application to a very limited area. Another type of hand sprayer is the old familiar standby, consisting of a hand pump (like a bicycle fump) mounted on top of a metal or glass container. here are single-action models, in which the spray stops at the end of each stroke, and continuous-action models, in which the spray is uninterrupted as long as you keep pumping. Many of these sprayers have a nozzle that adjusts for either a fog or a residualtype spray. It's best to choose a sprayer with an adjustable nozzle that is made of a non-corrosive material and can be easily cleaned.

Insecticide Pump FoggerGarden Duster Hand Crank

Figure 8.17 Crank dusters

The crank duster operates with a hand crank that forces the insecticide into a fan where it is blown out over the vegetables. Crank dusters are only practical when you are cultivating large acreage.

Figure 8.17 Crank dusters

The crank duster operates with a hand crank that forces the insecticide into a fan where it is blown out over the vegetables. Crank dusters are only practical when you are cultivating large acreage.

Insecticide Duster

Figure 8.18 Compressed-air sprayers

These are made of galvanized steel or plastic and are pumped by hand to create air pressure. They are available in sizes of from 1 to 15 gallons or more. Most have adjustable nozzles. A long wand allows you to reach easily under the leaves.

Figure 8.18 Compressed-air sprayers

These are made of galvanized steel or plastic and are pumped by hand to create air pressure. They are available in sizes of from 1 to 15 gallons or more. Most have adjustable nozzles. A long wand allows you to reach easily under the leaves.

Hose end sprayers consist of a nozzle, a holding jar and a female hose end that can be attached to your garden hose. The chemicals can be diluted or mixed in proper proportions right in the jar. Some of these sprayers come with an adjustable nozzle that allows you to mix chemicals and water in whatever proportion you desire during the spraying action. And some models are equipped with a pistol grip handle for each operation. These sprayers are fine for applying chemicals to small gardens.

Slide sprayers sometimes called trombone sprayers, utilize a small, round, brass slide pump. There is no tank; the hose end is placed in a bucket or some other open source of water. These sprayers sometimes come with adjustable brass nozzles and will reach to a distance of about 35 feet. Most are double-action and give a continuous spray.

Compressed-air tanks are usually made of galvanized steel or plastic and are pumped by hand to create air pressure that forces out the spray. They are highly adaptable and range in capacity from one to fifteen gallons; the usual size is two gallons. The smaller tanks are often carried by a shoulder strap. The larger ones use a golf-bag type of caddy. Compressed-air tanks can handle both oil-based sprays and wettables, and are excellent for use in large gardens.

Back pack sprayers are fairly large metal or plastic containers that are designed to be strapped to the user's back. Most hold about four gallons of liquid and are pumped with a hand lever. Some are equipped with a small gas-operated compressor.

Electric sprayers are quite similar to the other large sprayers, but utilize a rechargeable battery for compressor power.

Power sprayers There are a number of large-volume all-purpose, power-drive sprayers on the market with tanks that hold ten gallons of liquid and more. Some models are designed to be pulled by a garden tractor, others are self-propelled.

DUSTERS

Some gardeners prefer to apply insecticides in dry dust rather than liquid form. Dusters actually are an extremely convenient and effective method of applying chemicals to vegetables. There two basic types available: The Piston Duster, for small-to-medium-sized gardens, stores the dust in a dust chamber. The dust is forced out by hand action of the piston. These small dusters hold up to two quarts of dust. Crank Dusters are large enough for use on eight to ten acres. They are operated by a hand crank which forces the dust into a fan where it is blown out over the vegetables. Extension tubes put the dust exactly where is is needed. Some large dusters utilize a power source.

ANIMALS

Some species of animal can be an extreme nuisance in the garden.

Gophers can be driven out using a gopher-mole windmill, which essentially sets up a vibration in the ground that gophers and moles cant tolerate. Mothballs or moth flakes can also be used to keep gophers out of the garden. Rabbits can be held off completely by surrounding your plot with a chicken wire fence.

Birds are a mixed blessing. They feed on damaging insects which is why many gardeners build birdhouses to attract them. On the other hand, some birds will eat seedlings of such fruit as tomatoes. One defense: hang up metal foil strips on strings extended two or three feet over the garden. An extreme measure would be to enclose the garden completely with gauze of chicken wire held up by posts and a frame.

ANIMALS

Square Foot Garden Rabbit Fence

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Organic Gardening

Organic Gardening

Gardening is also a great way to provide healthy food for you and your loved ones. When you buy produce from the store, it just isnt the same as presenting a salad to your family that came exclusively from your garden worked by your own two hands.

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