Frontend rototillers

Advantages:

  1. Lighter and generally less expensive than rear-end.
  2. Mover manoeuverable, can turn in less space, making it easier to work garden beds.
  3. Good digging capability. Takes fewer passes to get the soil in good shape.

Disadvantages:

  1. Some compacting occurs, since wheels pass over soil that tines have tilled.
  2. Not easy to control without strength and effort Jumps and bucks in heavy soil or when rocks are hit

Rear-End rototillers

Advantages:

  1. Easy to operate. Can be guided with one hand. Good for people without the strength necessary to run a front-end model.
  2. More efficient for breaking ground in heavy soils over large areas.

Disadvantages:

  1. Generally more expensive than front-end, although not prohibitively so.
  2. Less manoeuverable than front-end.
  3. Digs only six to nine inches deep.

Figure 5.08

Figure 5.08

Worm Wheel Gear Adjustments

John Deere tillers

The steel tines of this tiller are driven by a worm gear syswtem constructed with long-lasting antifriction roller bearings. The depth bar setting and wheel adjustment control tilling depths and forward speed. Reverse drive allows it to back away from fences and tight spots without having to be lifted.

JOHN DEERE

Moline, IL 61265

John Deere tillers

The steel tines of this tiller are driven by a worm gear syswtem constructed with long-lasting antifriction roller bearings. The depth bar setting and wheel adjustment control tilling depths and forward speed. Reverse drive allows it to back away from fences and tight spots without having to be lifted.

JOHN DEERE

Moline, IL 61265

Characteristics of tillers

There is a wide variation among tillers in their horsepower and engines, speed, size, type of tines, tilling width and depth, handles, and available accessories. The greatest choice is found among front-end tillers, with many different models on the market Rear-end tillers tend to be somewhat similar in construction, ranging in horsepower from 4 to 10; front-end models range from 2 to 8 hp.

Engines: Offered in two- or four-cycle models. The former are fueled by oil and gas mixed together; the later have separate gasoline and oil chambers, like an automobile. Another choice is between gear drive and chain drive; the latter is more expensive initially but is up to 35 percent more efficient

Speed: The less expensive machines are one-speed, good for average-to-loose soil and for cultivation. Two-speed operation helps in deep digging and is faster in churning soil and in mixing several ingredients. A few expensive tillers have four speeds, one each for heavy, medium and light soil, and for cultivating.

Size: Small, medium and large are the obvious variations here. Of interest is a relatively new idea, the compact tiller with foldable handle. This variant can be easily transported in a car trunk or stored in a small space; it is excellent for tilling easy, workable soil, but not good enough for heavier work.

Tines: There are generally three choices—spring-steel, bolo and slasher—for different uses. Spring-steel

Figure 5.09

Figure 5.09

Rototillers

Adjustable tiller

A versatile tiller that can work narrow or wide areas. The tilting width can be adjusted from 7 to 22 inches — useful for weeding between rows. Was a chain drive and steel tines. FORD NEW HOLLAND New Holland, FA 17557

Adjustable tiller

A versatile tiller that can work narrow or wide areas. The tilting width can be adjusted from 7 to 22 inches — useful for weeding between rows. Was a chain drive and steel tines. FORD NEW HOLLAND New Holland, FA 17557

tines are all-purpose, made of special heat-treated steel that absorbs the impact of stones and rocks. They can penetrate hard soil, blend in organic material, and do a good job of bordering and cultivating. Bolo tines are narrow and curved, good for deep tilling and shallow weed control. Slasher tines provide brute strength for tough soil and roots.

Tilling width and depth: Many models give you only one width (often 20 inches), while others have adjustable widths from 6 to 32 inches. (One model has expansion tines to 5 feet!) On most front-end models depth capability varies from 7 to 12 inches. Most machines are adjustable, utilizing adjustable wheels, a depth stick, or a combination of both. On some models the depth can be controlled from the handle while tilling.

Handles: In addition to the folding handles on compact tillers, other models have tilt handles, allowing the operator to walk alongside, not behind, the tines and thus not leave any footprints in the newly cultivated soil. And some handles can also be adjusted up and down.

Accessories: A wide and ever-increasing variety of attachments are offered. With some, your tiller can be converted into a tractor for plowing, cultivating, leveling and even snow removal and other such jobs.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Growing Soilless

Growing Soilless

This is an easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide to growing organic, healthy vegetable, herbs and house plants without soil. Clearly illustrated with black and white line drawings, the book covers every aspect of home hydroponic gardening.

Get My Free Ebook


Responses

  • Cailean Clark
    Are front tillers a good choice?
    7 years ago

Post a comment