Distinguishing Features

Ulmus Znthova

Bark fissured Bark smooth

ULMUS CARPINIFOLIA Gted. (Smooth Elm) This elm is a native of central and southern Europe and in Britain it occurs mostly in southern and eastern England. It is a variable deciduous tree 70 to 90 feet high with spreading branches and a rough bark, The alternate leaves have short stalks and toothed, pointed blades up to four inches long. The blades are smooth or very slightly hairy above and they are asymmetrical at the base. The pink flowers appear in dense clusters before the leaves unfold. The circular notched winged fruits each contain a single seed but they are rarely fertile. The elms are very variable and difficult to identify. The English Elm, U. procera, appears to be unknown outside this country. The canopy forms several rounded lobes and the upper surfaces of the leaves are always rough. The Wych Elm, U. glabra, with larger leaves and few suckers, is a European species found most commonly in the west and north of England. (Ufmaceae)

Celtis Australis

CELTIS OCCIDENTALS L. (Hackberry, Sugarberry) This is a native of North America but is hardy in Britain and occasionally planted in gardens. It is a deciduous tree up to 120 feet high with a wide crown and smooth grey bark. The alternate leaves, which are up to four inches long, have ovate pointed blades with serrate margins especially towards the tip. The small male and bisexual flowers are borne in clusters. The fruit is like a small dark red cherry and is borne on a slender stalk. There are at least four native species of Celtis in Europe. The best known is C. australis which is widespread in the Mediterranean region. It is up to 80 feet high and has lanceolate toothed leaves and dark brown fruits. The wood is hard and thin shoots are used for making handles of whips. (Ulmaceae)

Prunus Cerasifera Draw

PRUNUS AVIUM L. (Wild Cherry, Gean) This familiar tree is common in hedges and woods throughout Britain, Europe and western Asia. It sometimes reaches 80 feet in height and has a glossy grey-brown bark which peels off in horizontal strips. The alternate drooping leaves have weak stalks and elliptical blades up to six inches long with toothed margins. There are two conspicuous glands at the top of the leaf stalk. The white flowers have long thin stalks and are borne in small clusters. The fleshy edible fruits are usually dark red.

The Wild Cherry provides an attractive display during its short flowering period. It is the ancestral form of our cultivated sweet cherries and varieties with double flowers are often planted for ornamentation. P. cerasus, a small tree or shrub, is similar to and often confused with P. avium. It has sour fruits and it is the ancestor of the Morello Cherry. (Rosaceae)

Padus Avium Winter

PRUNUS PADUS L. (Bird-Cherry) The Bird-Cherry occurs in Europe, western Asia and Asia Minor and is a native in northern parts of Britain. It is a small deciduous tree or shrub up to 40 feet high with a brown peeling bark. The alternate leaves are three to five inches long and have ovate pointed blades with small sharp marginal teeth. The pendulous racemes ol 10 to 40 white flowers appear in May. The small ovoid blue-black fruits have a thin fleshy layer with a very bitter flavour. In spite of this they are said to be eaten by birds.

This species is often planted as an ornamental tree and the wood is used in furniture construction to a limited extent. (Rosaceae)

Prunus Mahaleb Inflorescence

PRUNUS MAHALEB L. (St Lucie Cherry) This is a small deciduous tree up to 40 feet high found mainly in central and southern Europe. It is especially frequent on calcareous soils. The twigs are hairy and bear alternate broadly ovate, pointed leaves about two inches long with toothed margins. The small white fragrant flowers are borne in short pendulous racemes during May, The small black rounded fruits are very sour.

There are a number of cultivated varieties and it is often planted in gardens in Britain. It is also used as a stock on which selected varieties of cultivated cherries are grafted. It is of no value in forestry. (Rosaceae)

Feature Trees For Small Gardens

PRUNUS SERRULATA Lindley (Japanese Cherry) This small deciduous tree is a native of China and Japan. It is about 20 teet high with a short trunk covered by a brown bark and spreading branches forming an umbrella-shaped crown. The alternate leaves are up to si* inches long and have lanceolate to ovate, toothed blades which are somewhat glaucous on the under surface. The white or pink flowers are borne in short racemes and when fertile they give rise to small black fruits. There are many cultivated varieties and Its small size and neat habit make it an ideal tree for planting in gardens and on roadsides. The masses of flowers produced In May make a magnificent display. Some varieties, like the one illustrated above have double flowers. Two other species from Japan, P. tomentosa and P. subhirtella, are also grown in gardens. (Rosaceae)

Cherry Plums Thorned Tree

PRUNUS CERASifERA Ehrh. (Cherry Plum) This native of south-east Europe and western Asia is a small deciduous shrub or tree up to 20 feet high. The alternate, stalked leaves are two to four inches long and have elliptical toothed blades. The stalked white flowers are solitary or in small groups. The pendulous ovoid fleshy fruit is about an inch across and has a yellow or red skin.

This species grows well In Britain although it seldom fruits and Is frequently used tor hedges. The plant known as P, pissardii with purple foliage and pink flowers Is a variety often planted in gardens. The Cultivated Plum, P. domestica, the Bullace, P. insi-titia and the Greengage, P. italica are all believed to be derived from a hybrid between the Cherry Plum and our common native Sloe, P. spinosa. (Rosaceae)

S OR BUS ARIA (L.) Crantz (While Beam) This species is a native of central and southern Europe and is common on calcareous soils in southern England, It is a deciduous shrub or tree up to 40 feet high with a smooth grey bark. The alternate leaves are up to five inches long and have ovate toothed leaves covered beneath with a dense felt of hairs. The white flowers are borne in flat clusters and appear in May. The bright red ovoid fruits are rather less than halt an inch across. This Is an extremely variable tree which has been separated Into a number of species differing in habit and leaf shape. Some have a very limited distribution. Hybrids between the White Beam and both the Mountain Ash, S.aucuparia, and the Wild Service Tree, S.torminalis (p. 97), have been recorded in Britain. (Rosaceae)

Wild Service Image

SORBUS TORMINAUS (L.) Crantz (Wild Service Tree) The Wild Service Tree is found in Europe, western Asia and North Africa and is widespread in most of England although not common. When not coppiced it grows into a fine tree up to 80 feet high with a wide crown and grey bark. The stalked alternate leaves are two to four inches long and the broadly ovate blades, which are green on both sides when mature, have several pointed serrate lobes. They turn various shades of orange and red before they fall, making the tree particularly attractive in the autumn. The groups of white flowers appear in June. The greenish-brown ovoid fruits have a bitter flavour but are considered edible after they have been subjected to frost. (Rosaceae)

Wild Apple Pyrus Mitis

MALUS SYLVESTRIS Mill. (Crab Apple) The Crab Apple is a native of Europe and western Asia and is common in woods and hedges throughout Britain. It is a small deciduous shrub or tree up to 35 feet high. The alternate dark green leaves are about two inches long and have oval pointed coarsely serrated blades. The clusters of flowers, which have pinkish petals and are up to two inches across, are borne on short spur shoots. The small rounded fruits are yellowish-green, often with a red tinge; they have a sour flavour.

Two distinct subspecies are recognized. In ssp. sylves-tris thorns are usually present, the twigs are without hairs and the small fruit is always sour. The other, ssp. mitis, only rarely has thorns, the twigs and buds are hairy and the large fruit is often sweet. It appears that most of our cultivated apples are descended from the latter form. (Rosaceae)

PYRUS COMMUNIS L. (Wild Pear) This species occurs across most of Europe to central Asia and is widespread in England and Wales although its status as a native in Britain is open to doubt. It is a deciduous tree reaching about 60 feet in height with a broad pyramidal crown. The fissured bark is grey and the buds and twigs pale brown. The alternate leaves have long stalks and finely serrated oval blades. The white flowers are over an inch across and appear in small clusters. The globose fruit has a rough brownish skin and sharp gritty flesh.

Well over 1000 varieties of cultivated pears are known and they have all been derived from this species. (Rosaceae)

CRATAEGUS OXYACANTHOSES Thultl. (Hawthorn) This Hawthorn is a native of Europe and occurs in England especially in eastern parts but is not very com' mon, it grows mostly in woods on heavy soils. It is a small deciduous thorny tree or shrub rarely more than 30 feet high. The dark green leaves have short stalks and those of the short shoots have shallow broad toothed lobes. The leaves on the long shoots are often more deeply lobed. The stalked white flowers are borne in small clusters in May or early June. They usually have two styles, although some flowers may have one or three and the dark red ovoid fruits moslly contain two stones.

CRATAEGUS MONOGYNA Jacq. (Common Hawthorn) This species is widespread in Europe and is common throughout England particularly in scrub land. It grows on most kinds of soils and is the commonest plant used for hedges. In habit it is very similar to C. oxyacan-thoides but the leaves of the short shoots are generally more deeply dissected. The flowers appear about a week earlier and they are more numerous in the clusters. Most of the flowers have a single style and there is only one stone in the fruit.

These two species can usually be distinguished when In flower or fruit but leaf shape is so variable, especially where the plants have been clipped, that this feature is not in itself always a reliable feature for identification. Further, where the two species grow together hybrids with intermediate characters are found. Many pink, red and double varieties of these two species are frequently grown in gardens. The Glastonbury Thorn, C. monogyna v. biflora, which flowers around Christmas time, is supposed to have arisen from the staff of Joseph of Arimathea. (Rosaceae)

American Sycamore FlowersMespilus Germanica

MESPILUS GERMANICA L. (Medlar) The Medtar is probably a native of south-east Europe and Persia but owing to widespread cultivation it has become naturalized throughout Europe and southern England. It is a shrub or spreading tree up to 20 feet high which sometimes bears thorns. The young twigs are hairy and the alternate leaves, which are about five inches long, have very short stalks and dull green lanceolate blades. The solitary terminal flowers are white or pink and two inches in diameter. The globose fruit is brown and crowned with the persistent calyx. It contains a single seed and Is at first very hard but when over-ripe the flesh becomes soft and it is In this condition that it is eaten.

The Medlar is closely related to Hawthorn and hybrids between them are known. (Rosaceae)

Morus Nigra Wood

MORUS NIGRA L. (Common Mulberry) This is a native of Persia which has been cultivated for a long time In many countries including Britain. It is a deciduous tree up to 30 feet high with a wide crown and deeply grooved bark. The large alternate leaves are dark green above but much paler beneath and have more or less heart-shaped serrated blades which are sometimes irregularly lobed. The flowers are unisexual and borne in separate small spikes. The cylindrical 'fruits', which are dark red when mature, are composed of the fleshy perianths of the female flowers.

Two other species are sometimes cultivated: the Red Mulberry, M. rubra, which has dark purple flowers and is a native of North America; the White Mulberry, M. alba, with white or pinkish fruits, comes from China and its leaves are used to feed silk-worms. (Moraceae)

Morphology Mulberry

BROUSSONETIA PAPYRIFERA Vent. (Paper Mulberry) This is a deciduous tree up to 30 teet high which is a native of China and Japan, The alternate leaves are about eight inches long with long stalks and heart-shaped blades similar to those of the Common Mulberry but even more variable in outline. The unisexual flowers are borne in narrow cylindrical catkins on different trees. The red fruit is spherical, about one inch across.

It is widely cultivated in China where the bark is used for making paper. It is also grown in southern Europe and is occasionally found in gardens in Britain. (Moraceae)

Botanical Drawing Quercus Robur

QUERCUS ROBUR L (Common Oak) The Common Oak occurs throughout Europe and Asia as far as the Urals and is a widespread native in Britain particularly on heavy soils, II is a deciduous tree 70 to 90 feel high with a rough bark and smooth grey twigs which bear numerous light brown buds. The alternate leaves are two to lour inches long with ovate pinnately lobed blades which have upturned edges on either side of the leaf stalk. The small male flowers are borne in slender catkins and one to five female flowers occur on separate stalks. The familiar fruit or acorn is a brown ovoid nut attached to a scaly cup. This is still one ol our most important forest trees. The hard durable timber is put to many uses although it is no longer required in quantity for ship building. (Fagaceae)

Quercus Petraea Drawing

QUERCUS PETRAEA (Mattuschka) Ueb, (Durmast Oak) The Durmast Oak ¡s very similar to the Common Oak in general appearance and also occurs in Europe and western Asia. It can be distinguished by its leaves, which have longer stalks and no upturned auricles at the base of the blades. Further, the acorns have scarcely any stalks.

It is a widespread native tree in Britain and Is particularly common on the calcareous soils of the north and west. Where our two native oaks occur together, for example in certain parts of southern England, fertile hybrids between them are frequently found. The timber of both species is equally valuable although the Durmast Oak is more often planted as it appears to be less subjected to pests and diseases. (Fagaceae)

Quercus Pyrenaica Draw

QUERCUS PYRENAICA Willd.

This oak is a native of southern Europe and is particularly common in humid coastal regions. It is a deciduous tree up to 50 feet high with a twisted trunk covered by a deeply fissured bark. The alternate leaves are about six inches long with obovate deeply lobed blades which are dark green above and pale, hairy below. The brown ovoid acorns are often borne in opposite pairs on the fruiting stalk.

This species is particularly prone to Oak Mildew, a fungus disease which produces a white powdery layer on the leaves. Our native oaks are also attacked by this disease especially in wet summers. (Fagaceae)

Quercus Cerris

QUERCUS CERRIS L, (Turkey Oak) The Turkey Oak is a native of southern Europe and southwestern Asia but is often ptanted in Britain and has become naturalized in a number of places. It is a deciduous tree 80 to 100 feet high with a blackish fissured bark and hairy young twigs. The alternate leaves are two to si* inches long with oval blades which have more or less poinled lobes. The dull green leaves bear scattered rough hairs particularly on the upper surfaces. The acorns, which are often clustered, mature in their second year and are contained in cups with a dense covering of pointed scales.

The Lucombe Oak, which is often ptanted in western England, is a variable hybrid between the Cork Oak (p. 110) and the Turkey Oak. (Fagaceae)

Are The Holm Oak Nuts Edible

QUERCUS ILEX L. (Holm Oak)

The Holm Oak is a native of the Mediterranean region but it is commonly planted in Britain and has become naturalized in southern England. It is an evergreen tree with grey scaling bark and hairy young stems. The alternate, stalked leaves are one to three inches long. The leaf blades are dark green and shining above and covered wilh a felt of white hairs underneath. They are more or less ovate with entire or distantly toolhed margins. The pointed acorn is reddish brown when mature and borne in a stalked greyish hairy cup.

This species will grow on calcareous and poor soils. The wood is as hard as that of our native oaks and is used in cabinef-making. It also makes excellent firewood. (Fagaceae)

Quercus Suber Draw

QUERCUS SUBER L (Cork Oak)

The Cork Oak occurs in southern Europe and North Africa, It is an evergreen tree up to 60 feet high with a broad crown and thick corky bark. The young twigs are hairy and bear alternate, stalked leaves two to three inches long. The leaf blades are ovate pointed with toothed margins, dark green above and covered with grey felty hairs below. The elongated pale brown acorns are usually solitary and are borne in stalked scaly cups. This species is occasionally grown in Britain but it is subject to frost damage. It Is extensively cultivated within its native range (or the valuable bark which is removed every seven to ten years. (Fagaceae)

Quercus Lusitanica

QUERCUS LUSITANICA Lam. (Lusitanlan Oak) This species is a native of southern Europe where it occurs as a semi-evergreen tree reaching 50 feet in height. The twigs are downy and bear alternate stalked leaves up to five Inches long. The ovate slightly toothed blades are bright green above and greyish underneath. The short conical acorns are borne in scaly cups.

QUERCUS COCCIFERA L. (Kermes Oak) This is a small evergreen tree or shrub never much more than 15 feet high which occurs mainly on limestone In the Mediterranean region. It has small leathery hairless leaves which have ovate blades with spiny margins. The acorns are borne in cups covered with curved spines. The main interest of this species lies in the fact that it is attacked by a scale insect related to the Cochineal insect. The female insects were formerly collected and when dried yielded an intense red dye. (Fagaceae)

AMERICAN OAKS

The oaks illustrated on the preceding pages are all natives of Europe but there are a number of North American species which are often planted for ornamental purposes In Britain,

Quercus falcata Michx. (Spanish Oak), This species occurs In southern United States. It reaches 90 feet in height and has a smooth grey bark. The alternate leaves have long stalks and pointed lobes. The acorn is round with a terminal point and lies in a shallow cup. Quercus macrocarpa Michx. (Burr Oak). This is a deciduous tree up to 50 feet high which is generally distributed in North America. The obovate leaves have a large terminal lobe and the acorns are borne in fringed cups.

Quercus palustris Muenchh. (Pin Oak). This is a deciduous tree up to 100 feet high with a smooth bark. The deep pointed lobes of the alternate leaves are toothed at the apex. The leaves turn deep red in the autumn. The squat acorns are home in shallow scaly cups. The timber is of high quality.

Quercus alba L. (White Oak). A handsome tree up to 100 leet in height with bright green deeply lobed leaves which turn purple in autumn. The acorns are elongated and borne in stalked scaly cups. Quercus coccinea Muenchh, (Scarlet Oak), This is a deciduous tree up to 80 feet high with a smooth bark and hairless twigs. The leaves are similar to those of the Pin Oak and remain on the tree for some weeks after turning bright red in the autumn. Quercus phellos L. (Willow Oak). A deciduous tree up to 100 feet high with a smooth grey bark and alternate narrow lanceolate pale green leaves resembling those of a willow. The acorn is small and is borne in a shallow cup.(Fagaceae)

Cuereo s fálcala acorn: % to 1 In. Quercus macroctrpa

Cuereo s fálcala acorn: % to 1 In. Quercus macroctrpa

Scarlet Oak AcornIllustrated American Tulip Tree Flower

URIODENDRON TULIPIFERA L. (Tulip Tree) This is a native of eastern North America whore it develops into a tall tree up to 000 feet high. In Britain it rarely attains more than 100 feet. It has brown young branches and large alternate stalked leaves up to eight inches long. The pale green blades are lobed and concave at the apex. The tulip-shaped flowers which appear in July ore one and a half inches across and have six greenish-white petals each with an orange band near the base. The flower has many free stamens and carpels and the fruit is cone-like with many one-seeded achenes. It is an attractive tree often planted in parks and gardens in Britain. The timber is known as canary whitewood. The only other species is the Chinese Tufip Tree, L. chinense, a smaller plant with grey twigs and no orange band at the base of the petals. (Magnoliaceae)

Brownbuds Band

LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA L. (Sweet Gum) 1 n eastern North America the Sweet Gum reaches a height of 150 feet but in Britain, where it is sometimes planted lor the beauty of Its autumn foliage, it is rarely more than TO feet high. The trunk is deeply fissured and the twigs have corky wings. The alternate leaves are up to six inches long with slender stalks and palmate toothed blades, The small unisexual flowers are borne in separate dense heads. The groups of female flowers give rise to a pendulous globose woody 'fruit' which is covered by the spiny persistent styles. The seeds are winged.

The commercial wood known as satin walnut is obtained from this tree. (Hamamelidaceae)

Platanus Hybrida Brot

PLATANUS jr HYBRID A Brot. (London Plane) This common deciduous tree attains 100 feet in height and has a smooth bark which peels off in large patches. The alternate leaves are up to 10 Inches in length with long stalks and broad lobed coarsely toothed blades. The small unisexual flowers are borne in dense spherical heads. There are usually two fruiting heads on each pendulous stalk.

The London Plane can resist atmospheric pollution and Is the most commonly planted tree in towns and cities of Europe and Britain. It appears to have arisen about 350 years ago and there is little doubt that it is a hybrid between the Oriental Plane, P. orientalis, from south-east Europe and western Asia and the Bulton Wood, P. occidental/s, a native of North America. (Platanaceae)

North American Oaks

FICUS CARICA L. (Fig)

Although believed to be a native of western Asia the Fig has been cultivated in Mediterranean countries tor many centuries. It can be a tree up to 30 leet high but in Britain it is usually a small bush. It is deciduous and has large alternate leaves about eight inches long with thick stalks and broad palmately lobed blades. The minute flowers are unisexual and are borne on the inside of a hollow fleshy receptacle. Pollination Is complicated and is eflected during stages of the lile cycle of a gall wasp. In sheltered situations in southern England fruit is produced but here it develops without pollination. All parts of the plant contain a milky latex and the wood is soft and of no commercial value. (Moraceae)

Olea Europaea Drawing

OLEA EUROPAEA L. (Olive)

The Olive is an evergreen tree about 40 feet high with a spreading crown and smooth grey bark. It is a native of the Mediterranean region where it is extensively cultivated for its valuable oil-containing fruits. The simple opposite leaves are up to three inches long with short stalks and leathery lanceolate or ovate blades which are dull green above and much paler below. The small insignificant flowers are borne in axillary groups. The ovoid fruit contains a single hard Stone and is purplish black when ripe.

The unripe fruits are pickled or eaten fresh but the best oil is obtained from fully mature fruits. The wood, which is hard and brown with dark streaks, is used in turnery and cabinet-making. (Oleaceae)

Single Foxglove Tree Leaf

PAULOWNtA TOMENTOSA Koch, C. (Foxglove Tree) This beautiful deciduous tree is a native of China but has been widely planted in parks and gardens in Europe and Britain since its introduction about 130 years ago. !t grows quickly and attains a height of 50 feet. The trunk has a smooth bark and the bent branches form a broad crown. The opposite ieaves are up to 12 inches long and have sfender stalks and heart-shaped or slightly lobed blades covered below with woolly hairs. The hairy flower buds persist through the winter and open in the following May after the leaves have unfolded. The scented purple flowers are two inches across and are borne in terminal inflorescences. The fruit is a dark brown pointed capsule containing numerous winged seeds. (Scrophulariaceae)

CAT ALP A SPP.

This genus includes about 10 species from Asia and North America. They are deciduous trees with large long-stalked simple or slightly lobed leaves, which are borne in opposite pairs or in threes. The conspicuous bell-shaped flowers are borne in large terminal clusters. The fruit is a long narrow pendulous capsule resembling a pod and the flattened seeds have a tuft of white hairs at each end. Several species are grown in Britain and make attractive ornamental trees. Catalpa speciosa Ward, (Western Catalpa). This is a native of North America where it reaches a height of 100 feet. It has a broad pyramidal crown and the trunk Is covered with a reddish-brown scaly bark. The leaves are up to 12 inches long and have heart-shaped pointed blades. The inner surface of the spreading white corolla is marked with yellow and purple. The narrow brown fruit reaches a length of 20 inches. This species grows quickly and Is often planted In the United States for Its durable timber.

Catalpa b/gnonioides Walt. (Indian Bean Tree). A native of eastern North America this species is similar to C. speciosa but is smaller in stature, the leaves are shorter but relatively broader and the flowers are slightly smaller. It reaches a height of 50 feet and has a dense spreading crown. The leaves, which are often in threes, are about eight Inches long and produce an unpleasant smell when bruised. The fruit is about 15 inches long, There are several cultivated varieties including v, aurea with yellow leaves,

Catalpa ovata Don, G. This is a small tree about 30 feet high which comes from China. The leaves mostly have three to five pointed lobes. The small flowers are

Catalpa Fargesii Chinese Drawing

yellowish-white with orange and purple marking. Two other species from China which are occasionally planted are C. fargesii, a small tree with pink flowers and broad leaves hairy on the under surface, and C. bungei with a pyramidal crown, smooth pointed leaves and flat clusters of white flowers. (Bignoniaceae)

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES Catalpa

Leaves often In threes

Fruit a long pod-like capsule

Paulo wnia

Leaves always in opposite pair« Fruit an avoid capsute

Bberell Fruit Trees

ACER PSEUDOPLATANUS L. (Sycamore) The Sycamore is a native of central Europe and western Asia but has been widely planted and has become naturalized throughout Britain. It is a deciduous tree up to 100 teet in height with a broad crown. The smooth bark is greyish-brown and the large buds have green scales. The opposite leaves are four to eight inches long with long stalks and coarsely toothed five-lobed blades. The greenish-yellow flowers are borne in pendulous racemes. The characteflstic brown two-seeded fruit separates into two portions each bearing a thin stiff wing, Thts tree can tolerate most soils and exposed conditions and is often planted as a wind break. Abundant fruits are produced and the seedlings are often conspicuous in lawns and gardens during the spring. The white, fine-grained wood is used for broom-heads and toys. (Aceraceae)

Acer Pseudoplatanus Stomata

ACER PLATANOIDES L. (Norway Maple) The Norway Maple has a similar native range to that of the Sycamore. It has been grown in Britain for many years but is not so widely naturalized as A, pseudo-platanus. It resembles the Sycamore but can easily be distinguished by its bark, leaves, flowers and fruits. The bark is fissured and the margin of the leaf blade is rounded between both the lobes and coarse teeth. When broken the leaf stalk exudes a whitish juice. The yellowish Mowers are borne in erect rounded groups and the wings of the fruit are widely divergent. There are a number ol attractive varieties In cultivation including the Eagle's Claw Maple, v. laciniatttm In which the lobes of the leaf blade are bent downwards, and v, reitenbachii in which the leaves are red when young and turn dark red in the autumn. (Aceraceae)

Acer Campestre Tree Leaf

ACER CAMPESTRE L. {Common Maple) This species is widespread in Europe, western Asia and Asia Minor. It is a native in England being commonest in the south and east. It is a small deciduous tree which can attain 60 feet but it is frequently coppiced or used for hedges. The pale grey bark has shallow fissures and the brown twigs frequently develop corky wings. The opposite leaves are up to three inches long with stalks which contain a milky juice and five-lobed palmate blades. The greenish unisexual flowers are borne in erect terminal clusters and the wings of the fruit spread out horizontally.

There are several cultivated varieties with yellow, purple or variegated leaves. The wood is used in cabinet-making and turnery. (Aceraceae)

Acer Monspessulanum

ACER MONSPESSULANUM L. (Montpelier Maple) This Maple is a native of central Europe and the Mediterranean region. It is a small deciduous tree 30 to 40 feet high with a furrowed bark and hairless twigs. The opposite leaves are up to two inches long and have slender stalks which do not contain a milky latex. The leaf blade has three obtuse lobes with almost entire margins. The yellowish-green flowers are borne in small pendulous clusters. The wings of the fruit are parallel and project forwards and their inner edges may actually overlap.

The Montpelier Maple is an attractive tree which is often planted in parks and gardens In Britain. The hard wood is used in furniture-making. (Aceraceae)

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Responses

  • chelsea gibson
    Are the holm oak nuts edible?
    7 years ago
  • jaska
    When does a cork oak shed its leaves?
    7 years ago
  • Lelia Bruno
    What does mulberry tree root system look like?
    7 years ago
  • ROSARIO
    Are sycamore tree flowers?
    7 years ago
  • MARIA
    Is mulberry a deciduous tree?
    2 years ago

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