Backfilling

Fill the hole with the original native soil - this is the soil the tree must ultimately move its roots into to survive. Large rocks can be removed when backfilling. Up to 25 by volume of composted organic matter can be mixed in with the backfill soil if it has a very high clay content and is difficult to work, but in such cases till the soil just outside the root ball 8 to 12 inches deep and several feet wide after planting to ensure good root growth. Otherwise use no other soil amendments....

Tree Selection Guide

The table on the next several pages summarizes a great deal of tree selection information for Utah. Nearly all trees that are commonly planted plus many that are fairly rare are included. All native trees also are included, since many of these may make good landscape plants but are rarely planted. The information included in this table is based on the knowledge of the authors or has been obtained from reliable sources. Little cultural information exists for some species, however. If you have...

Tree Size

Root Balled

The size of a tree largely determines the amount of transplant shock it will experience, with larger trees generally experiencing more shock. This shock is mainly caused by root loss during transplanting - trees can lose 90 percent or more of their roots when they are dug - and results in smaller foliage for at least one growing season and reduced shoot length and diameter growth for several seasons. Recovery from transplant shock takes about one year for each inch of trunk diameter for an...