Measure the spaces between features

Measuring how far apart things are will enable you to place features in accurate relationship to one another.

Engineers use triangles to brace things like bridges and buildings because the triangle is rigid. That rigidity works in measuring, too; it helps you place seemingly random site features — such as tree trunks, sheds, and kiddie pools — on your map with a high degree of precision. To use the secret art of triangulation, simply measure to, say, a tree trunk, from at least two points on a fixed feature, such as two corners of your house. When you transfer these measurements to paper, your tree will be in exactly the right location. Figure 6-2 shows how all this looks on your field notes.

Figure 6-2:

Site measurements with triangulation.

Figure 6-2:

Site measurements with triangulation.

Triangulation goes much more smoothly with a helper, but if you don't have one, no problem. Just add one more tool to your kit: a screwdriver. Use it to pin the end of the 100-foot tape to the ground (such as by a corner of your house) when you take your long measurements. Pivot to all the distant points you'll be measuring before you move to the next location.

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Organic Gardening

Organic Gardening

Gardening is also a great way to provide healthy food for you and your loved ones. When you buy produce from the store, it just isnt the same as presenting a salad to your family that came exclusively from your garden worked by your own two hands.

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