Measure the spaces between features

Measuring how far apart things are will enable you to place features in accurate relationship to one another.

Engineers use triangles to brace things like bridges and buildings because the triangle is rigid. That rigidity works in measuring, too; it helps you place seemingly random site features — such as tree trunks, sheds, and kiddie pools — on your map with a high degree of precision. To use the secret art of triangulation, simply measure to, say, a tree trunk, from at least two points on a fixed feature, such as two corners of your house. When you transfer these measurements to paper, your tree will be in exactly the right location. Figure 6-2 shows how all this looks on your field notes.

Figure 6-2:

Site measurements with triangulation.

Figure 6-2:

Site measurements with triangulation.

Triangulation goes much more smoothly with a helper, but if you don't have one, no problem. Just add one more tool to your kit: a screwdriver. Use it to pin the end of the 100-foot tape to the ground (such as by a corner of your house) when you take your long measurements. Pivot to all the distant points you'll be measuring before you move to the next location.

Homeowners Guide To Landscaping

Homeowners Guide To Landscaping

How would you like to save a ton of money and increase the value of your home by as much as thirty percent! If your homes landscape is designed properly it will be a source of enjoyment for your entire family, it will enhance your community and add to the resale value of your property. Landscape design involves much more than placing trees, shrubs and other plants on the property. It is an art which deals with conscious arrangement or organization of outdoor space for human satisfaction and enjoyment.

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