Looking at How Vines Hold On

Vines are interesting plants. Consider this: They've evolved to seize and enjoy a niche in the crowded world of plants, opportunistically going wherever the available space and adequate sunlight are. If their roots are secure and nur tured in the soil below, the top growth of vines is amazingly flexible. A vine can clamber through other plants, up or sideways as needed, and navigate tight spots until it arrives where it can bask and thrive. Pretty impressive!

Vines have adaptations that help them in their journeys. Or to be more specific, vines have their ways of hanging on as they climb. This information is important to know because it impacts the area or support structure you choose for your vine — you don't want damage, and you want the going to be easy. The following sections give you an overview of climbing methods, also illustrated in Figure 12-1.

Figure 12-1:

Star jasmine climbs by twining; grapes climb with tendrils; Boston ivy climbs via holdfasts; and climbing roses tend to sprawl.

Figure 12-1:

Star jasmine climbs by twining; grapes climb with tendrils; Boston ivy climbs via holdfasts; and climbing roses tend to sprawl.

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