Chapter Nutritional requirements Soilplant relationships

Relationship Between Cec And Clay

Plants in their natural environment have lived, with almost no exception, in association with soil, an association known as the soil-plant relationship. Soil provides four basic needs of plants water, nutrients, oxygen, and support. With the advancement of science and technology, humans have provided for these needs in an artificial way and have successfully grown plants without soil. All the various methods and techniques developed for growing plants without soil are collectively called...

The flower

Tomato Flowering Truss Detail

The tomato truss is composed of a succession of axils, each bearing a single flower Fig. 5 . The main stem of the truss peduncle is capable of branching one or more times such branched or double trusses can be encouraged by low-temperature treatment, a procedure discussed later. Branching is desirable because it usually increases the number of flowers per truss and allows the number of flowers on each branch to remain fairly constant, irrespective of the degree of branching Fig. 5 . The...

Growing greenhouse tomatoes in soil and in soilless media

Photo by Faye Clack Associates, courtesy of Ontario Greenhouse Vegetable Producers Marketing Board Agriculture Canada Publication 1865 E Communications Branch, Agriculture Canada Ottawa. Ont. K1A0C7 Minister of Supply and Services Canada 1991 Cat. No. A53-1865 1991E ISBN 0-662-18859-4 Printed 1991 5M-10 91 Produced by Research Program Service galement disponible en fran ais sous le titre La culture des tomates en serre sur sol et sans sol

Cultivar selection

The first decision that must be made is whether to grow a red-fruited or a pink-fruited cultivar This decision is normally based on market conditions, but it could also be influenced by the growing conditions and by the availability of cultivars. In general, the selection of red-fruited cultivars is greater than that of pink-fruited cultivars. However, a shortage of red-fruited cultivars with resistance to fusarium crown and root rot disease is often encountered. Canadian farmers have grown the...

Chapter Cropping in soil with drip irrigation

The drip irrigation cropping system is similar to but better than the conventional soil cropping system because it can be used to control crop growth through a regulated supply of water and nutrients. In addition, the system allows reduced relative humidity in the greenhouse because not all the soil is irrigated and because it is compatible with the use of white polyethylene film as a light-reflecting mulch. Resources, including energy, are thus used more efficiently with this system. Irrigate...

Plant propagation

Most greenhouse operators in Canada grow their own transplants. This is a desirable practice because it reduces the possibility of importing diseases and insects. However, transplant raising in other countries has been practiced successfully by specialized nurseries that ensure a reliable supply of low-cost high-quality transplants to local growers through the application of modern technology. Plant propagation is a vitally important stage in greenhouse vegetable production. The success of a...

The Harrow peatbag system

In the early 1980s the Harrow Research Station developed a peat-bag system for greenhouse tomato production. The recommendations for the peat-based growth medium and the corresponding fertigation schedule are presented in Tables 15 and 16, respectively Table 15 Peat-bag growth medium recommended for tomatoes 3.0 0.17 m3 bags of peat moss 57 of total volume 1 3.0 0.11 m3,7 kg bags of vermiculite 25 of total volumel A 2.0 0.11 m3,7 kg bags of perlite 18 of total volumel 5.0 kg limestone...

Peat bags

Plastic bags filled with a peat-based medium are now generally available. Each peat bag, which measures 35 cm x 105 cm when flat and contains 42 L of fertilized peat or a mixture of peat with vermiculite, perlite, or polystyrene , can support up to three tomato plants as long as regular watering and fertilizing through a drip irrigation system are provided. Cover the greenhouse floor with polyethylene film Plates 3,4 and lay the bags on it. Some growers use a double-layered polyethylene...

Chapter Cropping in rockwool and other inert media

Rockwool is a fibrous material produced from a granite-like rock known as diabase, or basalt. During manufacture the minerals are melted at a temperature of around 1600 C and transformed into fibers bonded together with resins. Initially manufactured for the building trade as an insulator, this spongy material has recently become available in cubes or slabs, to which a wetting agent is added to make it water-absorbent for horticultural use. Other inert products that have been used as growing...

Pruning and training

Modern tomato cultivars grown as greenhouse crops retain the characteristic weak stem of their wild ancestors and therefore require support when grown with a single vertical stem. Prune greenhouse tomatoes to a single stem. Remove all side shoots or suckers at least every week. Support the plants by plastic twine. Tie one end of the twine loosely to the bottom of the plant with a small, nonslip loop. Attach the other end to an overhead wire supported 1.8-2.5 m above the plant row. As the plant...

The trough system

After the growing medium is mixed, it is usually placed in a container. When soilless mixes were first developed, a wooden trough 15-20 cm deep and lined with polyethylene was the most common container used. A drainpipe laid along the centre of the trough drained the water and acted as a duct for steam during sterilizing Fig. 131. A layer of gravel provided general drainage and protected the polyethylene during cultivation. Since soilless mixes are naturally low in nutrients, fertilizers must...