Color Guide

Blue to Purple

Dianthus

Hemerocallis

Ajuga

Dicentra

Iris

Gray to Blue

Aquilegia

Echinacea

L igularia

Foliage

Aster

Eupatorium

Lysimachia

Achillea

Brunnera

Geranium

punctata

Artemisia

Campanula

Hemerocallis

Oenothera

Cerastium

Centaurea

Heuchera

Papaver orientale

Dianthus

montana

Iris

Rudbeckia

Echinops

Delphinium

Lobelia cardinalis

Sedum

Festuca cinerea

Erigeron

Lychnis

Trollius

Gypsophila

Hosta

Paeonia

Lavandula

Iris

Phlox

White

Sedum

Lavandula

Physostegia

Arabis albida

Thymus

Liatris

Saponaria

Aruncus

Linum perenne

Aster

Variegated

Mertensia

Yellow to

Astilbe

Foliage

Nepeta

Orange

Cerastium

Aegopodium

Phlox

Achillea

Dendranthema

Ajuga

Platycodon

'Coronation

Dianthus

Heuchera

Salvia

Gold'

Dicentra

Hosta

Tradescantia

Anthemis

Dictamnus

Lamiastrum

Veronica

tinctoria

Echinacea

Lamium

Viola

Asclepias

Galium

Miscanthus

tuberosa

Goniolimon

Polygonatum

Pink to Red

Aurinia saxatilis

Gypsophila

Pulmonaria

Achillea

Coreopsis

Hosta

Sedum

millefolium

Dendranthema

Iberis

Thymus

Anemone

Euphorbia

Iris

Armeria

Gaillardia

Leucanthemum

Aster

Geum

Paeonia

Astilbe

Helenium

Phlox

Centranthus

Helianthus

Veronica

Dendranthema

Heliopsis

Yucca

silver-leaved plants may be used to blend areas where colors meet.

A semi-chromatic color scheme divides the color wheel in half and uses any three adjoining colors, such as blue, violet and red; or red, orange and yellow. This approach is very popular today.

A polychromatic scheme includes any and every combination of colors. This type of design yields a great variety of colors and can be very festive. It is important to note, however, that even gardens of this type with seemingly haphazard arrangements achieve their success only through careful planning.

Grid Sheet for Planning Your Garden

Time and Duration of Bloom

Perennials vary considerably in when and how long they flower. A bloom chart, such as the one in the back of this bulletin (p. 27), will help you coordinate flowering periods to prolong a colorful display or to concentrate color during a particular time. If you own a summer home, for example, you might want to plant an August-flowering perennial bed. If you live in your home year round, you might want to plan a garden for spring, summer and fall color.

Although perennials can provide continuous bloom throughout the growing season, there are usually three or four peak periods when the display is at its best.

Remember also that perennials are grown for other attributes than flowers. Colorful or interesting foliage and fruit, unique forms and fragrance also provide interest. In a garden timed for continuous blooming, expect to see a fair amount of green foliage with intermittent flowers, rather than a solid mass of color. (See the Bloom Chart on page 27.)

BRUNNESA Jiber/tff? Formet-mt-nof

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