Simply leave it for a year while you fill the other bin

This "two all-purpose bins" system works well, as long as you make sure that each bin is big enough to take a year's waste without it overflowing. Because the compost includes some woody waste, the finished product is always a bit twiggy, but that shouldn't be a problem.

Material that's too tough to compost can be pushed under a hedge or made into a habitat pile in an out-of-the-way corner. If there's too much of the tough stuff, take or send it to your local community composting scheme.

This is essentially the system that operates in my garden, with two additions. My garden is surrounded by a tall beech hedge, and I also have about 25 sq.metres (30 sq.yds) of long grass -

it would be a gratuitous lie to describe it as a wildflower meadow. Both are cut once a year, and each generates a mountain of material that completely overwhelms the smooth running of my normal compost system. I don't have a shredder, so my hedge trimmings are taken away and composted by my local waste-disposal company. The "hay" from the "meadow" goes onto its own, open heap, which I occasionally excavate to retrieve quite decent compost from the bottom.

My two-bin system, made from salvaged timber, won't win awards for looks, but does the job.

My two-bin system, made from salvaged timber, won't win awards for looks, but does the job.

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