Ulmus x hollandica Vegeta

Huntingdon Elm Fruit Seed

Fruits or Huntingdon elm, ripening as the leaf-buds burst in April. Each fruit has a large wing with a single, centrally-placed seed, as shown by the enlarged example on the right ¡XlJ).

FIGURE 111

Winter twig of Huntingdon elm. with medium-sized buds on zig-zag twigs (life size). Below: a single bud (xS).

Ulmus Hollandica Twig

This beautiful tree is one of the many regional forms of elm that puzzle thebotanists. but simply delight lovers of the English landscape. It is a hybrid between the Wych elm, Ulmus glabra, and the Smooth-leaved elm, U. carpinifolia. It forms a magnificent tree with a straight bole and long straight branches, usually ascending. The leaves are large, like those of the Wych elm. and are remarkably oblique at the base. Distinguishing features are reddish hairs In the vein arches of the under surface, and a slight hairiness of the upper surface.

Huntingdon elm was raised in a nursery at Huntingdon, about the year 1750, from seed collected locally.

The nurseryman concerned propagated and sold it so extensively that it became prominent along the hedgerows of Huntingdonshire and neighbouring counties, and man}' fine specimens could be seen until elm disease killed most of them.

Unlike the Wych elm, it sends up sucker shoots freely. As our illustrations show, its characters of bud, leaf, flower and seed fall somewhere between the Wych elm and the English elm. described on the following pages. Flowers are shown in Figure 116, seeds on this page, leaves in Figure 119. outline in Figure 115.

FIGURE 111

Winter twig of Huntingdon elm. with medium-sized buds on zig-zag twigs (life size). Below: a single bud (xS).

Fruits or Huntingdon elm, ripening as the leaf-buds burst in April. Each fruit has a large wing with a single, centrally-placed seed, as shown by the enlarged example on the right ¡XlJ).

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