Hybrid Black Poplar

Populus 'Regenerate

Populus 'Regenerate' is one of the very large number of hybrid cultivars that have arisen through the deliberate or chance crossbreeding of different species. It is believed to have arisen about 1814 through the crossing of the European Black poplar, P. nigra (see page 50) with another hybrid, P. 'SerĂ³tina' (see page 54).

It is distinguished from that cultivar by: fine willow-like shoots; a shapeless lower crown.of outward arching branches, retained after they wither; the early flushing of green (not brown) opening leaves; and in being always female (never male).

As Populus 'Regenerata' is always a female tree, it has been chosen to illustrate typical seed pods, just opening in June. It is a figure 59

Leaves and seed pods of a hybrid Black poplar, Populus"Regenerate' (X|), which is a female tree. The leaves are a typical poplar shape - triangular-ovate. and show characteristic random velning. The fruiting catkin is typically necklace-like, and the older seed-pods, near the base of the stalk, are opening to release the hairy-tufted seeds.

Populus Nigra

figure 59

Leaves and seed pods of a hybrid Black poplar, Populus"Regenerate' (X|), which is a female tree. The leaves are a typical poplar shape - triangular-ovate. and show characteristic random velning. The fruiting catkin is typically necklace-like, and the older seed-pods, near the base of the stalk, are opening to release the hairy-tufted seeds.

very vigorous tree and was once widely planted for timber. Unfortunately it has proved susceptible to a serious disease, the bacterial canker of poplar caused by Xanthomonas populi, so its planting can no longer be recommended.

in circumstances like these, foresters naturally turn to a resistant cultivar that will grow equally fast without suffering from the disease concerned. When poplars are planted on a commercial scale for timber, it is most important that effort and money shall not be misdirected into some variety that cannot be expected to grow satisfactorily to full timber size. A good deal of poplar planting is nowadays carried out on fertile land, particularly in the Midlands and south of England, and where the ground is suitable the Forestry Commission makes grants, for schemes approved in advance, to meet part of the cost

The approved varieties of poplar which are now (in 1984) eligible for planting grants are: Populus x canescens

Populus 'Casale 78' (in southern England only)

Populus 'Eugenei'

Populus 'Gelrica'

Populus 'Heidemij' ('Laevigata'}

Populus 'Marilandica'

Populus 'Robusta'

Populus 'Serotina'

Populus tacamahaca X trichocarpa '32' Populus 'Berolinensis'

Planting sets of these cultivars are raised on a large scale by nurserymen, usually from foundation stocks that have been provided, after appropriate tests for resistance to disease, by the Forestry Commission,

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