Rose budding

Hybrid Tea and Floribunda roses should be propagated by inserting buds into seedling rootstocks rather than by taking stem cuttings. The advantage of rose budding is that the seedling rootstocks boost the vigour of the weaker varieties, which on their own roots may grow only 9 in or so, while reducing the potential of the more vigorous ones, which might otherwise reach 14-16 ft tall.

The selection of a suitable rootstock is one of the most important decisions when propagating roses. Although it is possible to collect a seedling of the wild rose from the hedgerow and use this as rootstock, this not only denudes the natural flora of the countryside but in fact is not really desirable as rootstock.

A rose rootstock should not produce suckers once the bush is eventually planted in its permanent position. It should ideally be of a variety that grows few thorns, and the actual process of budding will be easier if the neck of the rootstock is relatively long. All these advantages are found in Rosa laxa.

In winter, plant a seedling rootstock of 5-8 mm grade up to its neck in the ground. Space further plants about 9 in apart in a row, and earth them all up to cover their necks; then label them.

Budding is carried out once the bark of the rootstock lifts easily, usually after midsummer.

Pull away the earth from the rootstock neck. Make a T-shaped cut in the neck. Loosen the two flaps of bark a little.

Select a plant that has suitable budding material. From it choose a stem in which the flowers have just "blown", that is, gone over, and remove this stem with all its current season's growth. At this stage virtually all the buds on the stem will be suitable for propagation. Remove the leaves from the stem.

Hold a sharp knife just below a bud. Cut shallowly towards the tip of the stem round the bud. Lift off the bud together with its tail.

Insert the bud, tail upwards, between the flaps of bark on the rootstock. Trim the tail flush with the horizontal cut. Cover the bud with a rubber budding patch and pin it in position. This patch, which is made of non-vulcanized rubber, will perish at about the same rate as the bud unites with the root-stock—in about four to five weeks. This means that the rubber patch does not need cutting as it will not constrict the rapidly expanding neck of the plant.

The bud will develop before the end of the season or during the following season.

In late winter, cut off the top of the root-stock, just above the bud. This prevents possible stem suckers. The following autumn, replant the bush in its final place.

4 Cut shallowly towards the tip of the stem round a bud. Lift off the bud.

Standard Roses Rootstock

5 Insert the bud, tail upwards, between the flaps of bark on the rootstock.

6 Trim the tail flush with the horizontal cut.

Standard roses

Standard roses are propagated on to root-stocks of Rosa rugosa, which has single stems usually 6-8ft tall. Plant in winter in a row and support on wire attached to posts. Budding takes place during the following summer when the bark lifts. Two or sometimes three buds in a close spiral are worked on the rootstock in order to produce a more even and regular head. The height at which the leaf-buds are inserted will depend on the length of stem required. A standard rose is usually budded at about ft; a half-standard at about 2|ft.

Rosa Rugosa

1 Plant a seedling rootstock of 5-8 mm grade up to its neck in the open ground in winter. Earth up and label, it clearly.

2 Pull away the earth from the rootstock neck after midsummer. Make a T-shaped cut at the neck. Loosen the flaps of bark.

3 Select a plant that has suitable budding material. Cut off a stem in which the flowers have just "blown". Remove all the leaves.

1 Plant a seedling rootstock of 5-8 mm grade up to its neck in the open ground in winter. Earth up and label, it clearly.

2 Pull away the earth from the rootstock neck after midsummer. Make a T-shaped cut at the neck. Loosen the flaps of bark.

3 Select a plant that has suitable budding material. Cut off a stem in which the flowers have just "blown". Remove all the leaves.

Budding Standard Roses

7 Cover the bud with a rubber budding patch. Pin in position; then label.

Chip Budding

8 Cut off the top of the rootstock just above the bud in late winter.

9 Lift and plant out the new rose bush the following autumn.

Chip-budding

Chip-budding is perhaps the easiest way to bud a plant as it involves relatively few actions and, more importantly, it provides greater cambial contact between rootstock and scion than does shield-budding.

A "chip" of bark and wood is removed from the rootstock and replaced with a "chip" of similar dimensions carrying a bud from the plant to be propagated.

Chip-budding can be used to propagate any rosaceous plant, provided that the wood is sufficiently hard and mature. For the technique to be successful, it is necessary to prevent any water loss by sealing the cut edges extremely well.

Chip-budding can be carried out at any time of year provided that well-matured buds are available and temperatures are high enough (at least 10°C/50°F) to produce a union quickly.

Although this technique could be used on pot-grown rootstocks such as Magnolia grandiflora, it is usually carried out on root-stocks that have been planted in winter in the open ground.

In midsummer, remove all branches and leaves from the bottom 12-15 in of the root-stock stem.

Select a plant that is suitable for budding. Cut off some vegetative shoots with all their current year's growth and with well-matured buds, at least towards their base. Discard the softer top growth and carefully remove all the leaves flush with the stem.

Make a ^in cut down into the rootstock stem, at an angle of about 45 degrees. Start a top cut in above the lower cut and angle it down to join the basal cut; remove the chip.

Select a stem, or bud-stick, that has a similar diameter to the rootstock so that it is easy to match the cuts.

Make exactly similar cuts on the bud-stick as on the rootstock, ensuring that a bud is included midway down the chip.

Tuck the bud-chip into position on the rootstock and tie with polythene tape. Wind the tape round the rootstock, overlapping so that it seals the chip completely. Then label.

After three to four weeks the bud will have united with the rootstock and the tape can be removed, so allowing the bud to swell.

In winter, cut the rootstock right back, close above the bud but without damaging it. The bud will grow out the following season. If budding is done early, the bud may grow out before the end of the season.

Removing Buds From The Budstick

1 4 Discard the softer top ( growth on each bud-stick.

Remove all the leaves flush i with the stem.

5 Make a ^ in .cut down into the rootstock stem. Slice down to it from 1g in up the stem. Remove the chip.

6 Make exactly similar cuts on the bud-stick, ensuring that a bud is included midway down the chip.

1 Plant a suitaoie rootstock in the open ground in winter. Label it clearly.

Clear Budding Tape

2 Remove all branches and leaves from the bottom 12-15 in of the rootstock in midsummer.

3 Select a plant that is suitable for budding. Cut off some strong vegetative shoots with mature buds.

Rose Chip Buding

7 Tuck the bud-chip into position on the rootstock. Cover the chip with clear polythene tape; then label.

8 Remove the tape once the bud has united with the rootstock.

9 Cut the rootstock right back, close above the bud, in winter. The bud will grow out the next season.

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Responses

  • Macario
    Where to find rose root stock?
    3 years ago
  • juhana j
    How to select bud for budding?
    3 years ago
  • calimero
    How to perform budding in rose?
    3 years ago
  • renata
    Which rose bush does not produce suckers?
    3 years ago
  • nora lothran
    How to perform patch budding for rubber plants?
    3 years ago
  • Kenneth Lambert
    How to trim a bush round?
    3 years ago
  • Nora
    Why do rose leaves budding in winter?
    2 years ago

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